bandy


bandy
[16] To ‘bandy words with someone’ may go back to an original idea of ‘banding together to oppose others’. The word comes from French bander ‘oppose’, which is possibly a derivative of bande ‘group, company’ (source of English band). The rather complex semantic development goes from ‘taking sides’, through ‘opposing a third party’, ‘exchanging blows’, ‘exchanging hits’ (in the 16th and 17th centuries it was a term in tennis), to ‘exchanging hostile words’. The adjective bandy [17], as in ‘bandy legs’, probably comes from the noun bandy ‘curved stick used in an early form of hockey’ (the game was also known as bandy). It may ultimately be related to the verb bandy, the connection being the notion of knocking a ball to and fro. => BAND

The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins. 2013.

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  • Bandy — is a winter sport, where a ball is hit with a stick. It shares a common ancestry with ice hockey, in that it likely developed from the informal ball and stick on ice games known collectively as shinny. As such, the game is played outdoors on a… …   Wikipedia

  • Bandy — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Un partido de bandy. El bandy es un deporte de invierno donde una pelota es golpeada con un palo. El bandy se juega sobre el hielo. Desde mediados del siglo XX el término bandy se prefiere generalmente para evitar la …   Wikipedia Español

  • Bandy — bezeichnet: den Vorläufer des heutigen Eishockey; siehe Bandy (Sport) das Kinderinstrument Triola Orte in den Vereinigten Staaten: Bandy (Kentucky) Bandy (North Carolina) Bandy (Virginia) Bandytown (West Virginia) Bandy ist der Familienname… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • bandy — Ⅰ. bandy [1] ► ADJECTIVE (bandier, bandiest) ▪ (of a person s legs) curved outwards so that the knees are wide apart. ORIGIN perhaps from obsolete bandy curved hockey stick . Ⅱ. bandy [2] ► …   English terms dictionary

  • bandy — BÁNDY s.n. Hochei pe gheaţă care se practică cu mingea în loc de puc, pe un teren de fotbal. [pron. bendi. / < engl. bandy]. Trimis de LauraGellner, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DN  BANDY BÉNDI/ s. n. joc sportiv, asemănător cu hocheiul pe gheaţă, care …   Dicționar Român

  • bandy — (v.) 1570s, to strike back and forth, from M.Fr. bander, from root of BAND (Cf. band) (2). The sense apparently evolved from join together to oppose, to opposition itself, to exchanging blows, then metaphorically, to volleying in tennis. Bandy (n …   Etymology dictionary

  • Bandy — Ban dy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bandied} (b[a^]n d[ e]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bandying}.] 1. To beat to and fro, as a ball in playing at bandy. [1913 Webster] Like tennis balls bandied and struck upon us . . . by rackets from without. Cudworth. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bandy — Ban dy, n.; pl. {Bandies} ( d[i^]z). [Cf. F. band[ e], p. p. of bander to bind, to bend (a bow), to bandy, fr. bande. See {Band}, n.] 1. A club bent at the lower part for striking a ball at play; a hockey stick. Johnson. [1913 Webster] 2. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bandy — Ban dy, v. i. To contend, as at some game in which each strives to drive the ball his own way. [1913 Webster] Fit to bandy with thy lawless sons. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bandy — Ban dy, a. Bent; crooked; curved laterally, esp. with the convex side outward; as, a bandy leg. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bandy — bandy1 [ban′dē] vt. bandied, bandying [Fr bander, to bandy at tennis, lit., connect by binding: see BAND1, vt.] 1. to toss or hit back and forth, as a ball 2. to pass (gossip, rumor, etc.) about freely and carelessly 3. to give and take; specif …   English World dictionary